The Simile Museum

“When he speaks to her he imagines quite clearly the life they would have had, the life they would be sharing now. It is like walking past a house you used to live in: the fact that it still exists, so concrete, makes everything that has happened since seem somehow insubstantial. Without structure, events are unreal: the reality of his wife, like the reality of the house, was structural, determinative.”

– Rachel Cusk

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“L’Ouverture became like a ghost haunting my every waking thought. I took a nap upon coming home from the barbershop, and he even entered my dreams. In my nightmare he was a barber mangling my head.”

– Rion Amilar Scott

“Working alone over Thanksgiving break, it seemed to Roman that he heard a man and a woman speaking in his mind. Listening to them felt intimate and strange, like eavesdropping on conversation between a couple lying in the dark.”

-Lan Samantha Chang

“I devoured books like a person taking vitamins, afraid that otherwise I would remain this gelatinous narcissist, with no possibility of ever becoming thoughtful, of ever being taken seriously.”

-Anne Lamott

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“At sundown they camped at the base of a mesa that rose from the earth like a fist looking out over the plains that glowed golden as the sun disappeared beyond the Organs.”

-Robert James Russell

“Men rode the Tallapoosa River almost three hundred miles from Georgia to Alabama. Then just above the the Tallassee, thirty miles upriver, they built a dam in Montgomery. They come for the water’s strength–the waterfalls. They could power a mill with ’em, wet a town. They carved up Tallassee like cuts of meat. Sold her with the promise she was theirs.”

-Natashia Deón

 

“This was the process by which two lives were disentangled, eventually the dread and discomfort would fade and be replaced by unbroken indifference, I would see him on the street by chance, and it would be like seeing an old photograph of yourself: you recognize this image but are unable to remember quite what it was to be that person.”

-Katie Kitamura